Seth Godin: Is Ignorance the Problem?

Posted Friday, March 17th, 2017. Filed Under My Daily Dose | Leave a Comment

This post resonated with me today and I wanted to share.

Is ignorance the problem?
It’s nice to think that the reason that people don’t do what you need them to do, or conform to your standards, or make good choices is simply that they don’t know enough.

After all, if that’s the case, all you’ll need to do is inform them, loudly and clearly.

So, that employee who shows up late: just let her know that being late isn’t allowed. Threaten to fire her. That’ll do it.

The thing is, ignorance is rarely the problem.

The challenge is that people don’t always care about what you care about. And the reason they don’t care isn’t that they don’t know what you know.

The reason is that they don’t believe what you believe.

The challenge, then, isn’t to inform them. It’s to engage and teach and communicate in a way that shares emotion and values and beliefs.

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Seth Godin: The Road to Imperfection

Posted Friday, December 16th, 2016. Filed Under Corporate - Tips/Tools Blog | Leave a Comment

The road to imperfection
If you need to be perfect, it’s hard to press the ‘ship it’ button. Difficult to hire someone who makes things happen (because you’ll be responsible for what happens). Frightening to put yourself into a position where you’re expected to introduce new work.

The only way is forward. Forward moves us from what we have now (perfect, or at least we’re no longer living in fear of what’s not right) to a world filled with nothing but imperfect.

If you want motion, the only way is through. We get to the work we seek by passing through imperfection.

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Seth Godin: Job vs. Project

Posted Friday, June 10th, 2016. Filed Under Corporate - Tips/Tools Blog | Leave a Comment

I couldn’t agree more with these words:

Your job vs. your project

Jobs are finite, specified and something we ‘get’. Doing a job makes us defensive, it limits our thinking. The goal is to do just enough, not get in trouble, meet spec. When in doubt, seek deniability.

Projects are open-ended, chosen and ours. Working on a project opens the door to possibility. Projects are about better, about new frontiers, about making change happen. When in doubt, dare.

Jobs demand meetings and the key word is ‘later’. Projects encourage ‘now.’

You can get paid for a job (or a project). Or not. The pay isn’t the point, the approach is.

Some people don’t have a project, only a job. That’s a choice, and it’s a shame. Some people work to turn their project into a job, getting them the worst of both. If all you’ve ever had is jobs (a habit that’s encouraged starting in first grade), it’s difficult to see just how easy it is to transform your work into a project.

Welcome to projectworld.

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Seth Godin: Intuition

Posted Friday, February 26th, 2016. Filed Under Corporate - Tips/Tools Blog | Leave a Comment

Used wisely intuition is a great guide to go by. Many don’t know how or choose not to listen to their intuition or gut. It is one of our senses and one that is valuable.

Intuition
That’s what people call successful decision making that happens without a narrative.

Intuition isn’t guessing. It’s sophisticated pattern matching, honed over time.

Don’t dismiss intuition merely because it’s difficult to understand. You can get better at it by practicing.

Posted by Seth Godin on February 26, 2016

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Seth Godin

Posted Friday, January 29th, 2016. Filed Under Corporate - Tips/Tools Blog | Leave a Comment

I know this is my second post of Seth Godin today… I truly love his work.
This short article is powerful and makes so much sense especially if you want to change paradigms and/or systems.

Challenging takes courage and the willingness to fail and learn. I say understand your

The mythical 10x marketer
She’s not a myth.

Some marketers generate ten times (or a hundred times) as much value as a typical marketing person. How come?

The 10x marketer understands that the job isn’t to do marketing the way the person before you did it, or the way your boss asked you to do it. Strategic marketing comes from questioning the tactics, understanding who you are seeking to change and being willing to re-imagine the story your organization tells. Don’t play the game, change the game.
The 10x marketer doesn’t fold in the face of internal opposition.
These two points are essential and easily overlooked. If you are merely doing your job and also working hard to soothe all constituencies, it’s almost certain that your efforts (no matter how well-intentioned or skilled) will not create ten times as much value as a typical marketer would.

This means that an organization that isn’t getting 10x marketing needs to begin by blaming itself (for not asking the right question and for not supporting someone who answers the other question). 10x marketers are made, not born, and half the battle is creating a platform where one can work.

Beyond that, the 10x marketer embraces two apparently contradictory paths:

Persistence in the face of apathy. Important marketing ideas are nearly always met with skepticism or hostility, from co-workers, from critics and from the market. Showing up, again and again, with confidence and generosity, is the best response.
The willingness to quit what isn’t working. Sometimes the marketer faces a dip that must be survived, but the 10x marketer is also engaged enough to know the difference between that dip and a dead end that has no hope.
Not every project needs a 10x marketer. If you sell a commodity (or something you treat like a commodity) it’ll almost never happen. But if 10x is what you’re hoping for, learn to dance.

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This or that vs. yes or no
It’s much easier to persuade a philanthropist to fund your project than it is to persuade a rich person to become a philanthropist.

Encouraging someone to shift slightly, to pick this instead of that, is a totally different endeavor than working to turn a no into a yes, to change an entire pattern of behavior.

When looking to grow, start with people who already believe that they have a problem you can help them solve.

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The time to think about middlemen is before there’s only one
I grew up near a mall that had 42 shoe stores. If a store didn’t carry what you wanted, it wasn’t a big deal to walk 22 feet to a store that did.

The core issue of net neutrality isn’t whether or not a big corporation ought to have the freedom to maximize profit by choosing what to feature. No, the key issue is: what happens when users are unable to choose a different middleman?

In a town with ten newspapers, finding a newspaper that brings you the truth you seek is not a challenge. But network effects and lock in mean that in more and more arenas, there’s a natural monopoly arising.

The simple example is cable TV. It doesn’t pay to wire a town with five or six competing cable companies, and so we end up with one middleman. The simple understanding of net neutrality: When there’s only one middleman, who gets to decide what you see?

When local retailers disappear, who decides what you can buy? Do we want a middleman to be able to lock content out for their own reasons? I think it’s reasonable to have the following principle in place: Promote what you approve of, but don’t black out what you don’t.

We can argue that it’s smart branding and good business to let your users have what they want. But often, corporate short-term interests fly in the face of long-term customer satisfaction, and the race to profit gets in the way of our culture’s need to hear and see and read work that might not fit those interests.

What if search engines or ISPs decide to ‘disappear’ content they don’t like? When there are plenty of middlemen, it’s not really an issue. But when there’s lock-in, it’s too late to have this discussion.

We make a deal with the natural monopolies in our lives. They get the privilege and the profit of being the only one, but in exchange, they accept the responsibility of being open middlemen, of being neutral, of not blacking out those that don’t pay up or that don’t agree.

If ConEd or your local power utility said, “sorry, our electricity can’t be used on Maytag appliances because they didn’t pay a slotting fee,” you’d be appropriately incensed. But when it happens to ideas, I fear the cost is even greater.

We live in the connection economy, a world based on ideas. When a few corporate titans can control the flow of those ideas and the essence of that connection, we’ve given up far too much.

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If you choose to be in the dog food business…
Be delighted to eat dog food.

It makes no sense to disdain the choices your customers make. If you can’t figure out how to empathize and eagerly embrace the things they embrace, you are letting everyone down with your choice. Sure, someone needs to make this, but it doesn’t have to be you.

If you treat the work as nothing but an obligation, you will soon be overwhelmed by competition that sees it as a privilege and a calling.

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When in doubt, re-read rule one
Rule one has two parts:

a. the customer is always right

b. if that’s not true, it’s unlikely that this person will remain your customer.

If you need to explain to a customer that he’s wrong, that everyone else has no problem, that you have tons of happy customers who were able to successfully read the instructions, that he’s not smart enough or persistent enough or handsome enough to be your customer, you might be right. But if you are, part b kicks in and you’ve lost him.

If you find yourself litigating, debating, arguing and most of all, proving your point, you’ve forgotten something vital: people have a choice, and they rarely choose to do business with someone who insists that they are wrong.

By all means, fire the customers who aren’t worth the time and the trouble. But understand that the moment you insist the customer is wrong, you’ve just started the firing process.

PS here’s a great way around this problem: Make sure that the instruction manual, the website and the tech support are so clear, so patient and so generous that customers don’t find themselves being wrong.

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Seth Godin: Is better possible?

Posted Friday, July 4th, 2014. Filed Under Corporate - Tips/Tools Blog | Leave a Comment

I want to share this article by Seth Godin.

Is better possible?
The answer to this is so obvious to me that it took me a while to realize that many people are far more comfortable with ‘no’.

The easiest and safest thing to do is accept what you’ve been ‘given’, to assume that you are unchangeable, and the cards you’ve been dealt are all that are available. When you assume this, all the responsibility for outcomes disappears, and you can relax.

When I meet people who proudly tell me that they don’t read (their term) “self-help” books because they are fully set, I’m surprised. First, because all help is self help (except, perhaps, for open heart surgery and the person at the makeup counter at Bloomingdales). But even this sort of help requires that you show up for it.

Mostly, though, I’m surprised because there’s just so much evidence to the contrary. Fear, once again fear, is the driving force here. If you accept the results you’ve gotten before, if you hold on to them tightly, then you never have to face the fear of the void, of losing what you’ve got, of trading in your success for your failure.

And if you want to do this to yourself, well, I guess this is your choice.

But don’t do it to others. Don’t do it to your kids, or your students, or your co-workers. Don’t do it to the people in underprivileged neighborhoods or entire countries. Better might be difficult, better might involve overcoming unfair barriers, but better is definitely possible. And the belief that it’s possible is a gift.

We owe everyone around us not just the strongest foundation we can afford to offer, but also the optimism that they can reach a little higher. To write off people because you don’t think getting better is comfortable enough is sad indeed.

Better is a dream worth dreaming.

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